THE GRAND THREE (TRINITY)


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From what I was able to piece together from the traditional texts of my people and the information given to me by the Master Healer Caldor, the Grand Three was the belief that the world could not work without the Gods working in unity. Sirphan gives the world water and life. Darkel’s creations can then grow and feed Sirphan’s creations. Kidoss ensures that the creatures are protected and returns them to the earth from which they came. From this it is believed that life follows a circle and returns from once it came.

Those that followed this belief were the ancestors of my people – the Chijin – before we chose to let science replace belief. It later migrated to the Western Mountains, likely by word of mouth or merchants travelling from the South, to the primitive Morzi with their own spin on the religion where they set up stone idols to represent the three Gods. With what Master Healer Caldor explained regarding his Morzi apprentice, there was a morning ritual where she was responsible for cleaning the idols and garden on where the Gods’ ‘resided’. After the cleaning was complete she would then present gifts to the Gods, asking for their guidance and blessings for the coming day. During festival times the people of the village would gather and pray to the idols, some leaving gifts, while others touched or kissed the idols to be blessed.

This of course is one person’s interpretation of their belief as all records regarding the Morzi Trinity belief has been lost or may be mistranslated. It is also believed that the Trinity belief – better known as the Grand Three – was where the Gods’ Mark was first created. Sign of this symbol can be dated back to the first clans of the Chijin people over 10,000 year ago. You can find this symbol in Chijin architecture and even primitive clothing preserved in the University of Calin.

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Please note my attempt at the Gods’ mark above. The top of the trinity apparently represents the Goddess Sirphan, to the right is Darkel, and to the left if Kidoss. They are wrapped in a circle but their parts are separate, since they each play their own role in the circle of life but are at the same time united. Some also argue that the circle that surrounds the center trinity is a representation of the Gods’ mother, Fate, as Fate encompasses all things living and dead. This of course isn’t fact but it is a theory we must consider when approaching this subject. In regards to the use of this symbol by the followers of Kanrow – Chaos Singers – we can only assume they wanted to take a familiar symbol to make their outrageous claims of their text appear more valid than it actually is.

 

Update:

It has more recently been discovered that those of the supposed Six have been branded with the Gods’ Mark, although it is unclear if it is by choice or on purpose. The representative of the Six – Ambassador Liora of Morza – refuses to comment on the matter regarding the strange markings and responds with hostility whenever questioned about it. I quote, “Aren’t there better things to be asking than what marks are on our skin?”

At this point in time it is unclear if these brands could be the source of the Six’s strange abilities or if it is just coincidence. Further research must be conducted into the Gods’ Mark to have a clearer understanding of its purpose in the ‘Prophecy’.

 

Councillor Bargrim, University of La’reen

 

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The Western Valley: The Simple Village of Irbet


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Irbet is best known for their tavern, The Happy Farmhand, since that’s really all there is for visitors passing through the small town of 60 or so villagers.

Irbet is a self-sustaining farming and logging village in the Western Valley. Irbetians are relatively friendly folk with a mixed populace of defected Northerners and Easterners.

This village was originally a scouting post for King Ral of the North during the Era of Ago’kath. It later began logging and setting up a permanent hold in the valley after the Southern king – Ago’kath – died at the Fall of Hathos, which began the Era of Ral.

The village lived happily in the Western Valley, sending plenty of food and wood to Derm. With their distance from the Northern and Southern conflicts in the south-east, Irbet began to distance themselves from the north in hopes of defecting. Their wish to defect was granted during the reign of King Cark, who defined the borders of the North abandoning all settlements in the west.

Irbetians, although isolated, are happy with the choices they made over the years. The villagers are allowed to come and go as they please. Many becoming merchants to trade with the west and north avoiding the southern countries in fear of being killed due to their linage originating from Derm.

 

 

“If yah have the time, the brew is good and the air is fine.” -Merchant Rec  (Demor)

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“Their tavern is loud, the drinks are heavy, and the streets smell of bull. I don’t stop there unless I have to.”

-Merchant Maltoser Salvin (Arrowhilm)

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“Never would I have stayed in a place with a name like that… I was not impressed.”

-Master Healer Caldor Lefwid (Fish Bank)

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